Australia For Visitors > Wilsons Promontory, VIC

Wilsons Promontory
Victoria


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Wilsons Promontory (or "the Prom" as it is commonly known) is a large peninsula of rugged granite ranges and outcrops and sheltered coves and bays that just out into the Bass Strait between Victoria and Tasmania. It is the southernmost part of the Australian mainland.

The entire Wilsons Promontory peninsula was first reserved as a national park in 1898 and it is now Victoria's most popular national park.

But even with the large crowds it attracts, especially during the summer months, the size of the promontory (49,000 hectares) means that it is possible to get away from the crows and find some peace and quiet there.

The Wilsons Promontory offers the visitor more than 80 km of walks, some beautiful beaches and other magnificent scenery, and an abundance of wildlife.

Geology

The Wilsons Promontory is a granite massif formed some 350 million years ago when molten rock pushed up from the earth's depths and created mountains and valleys. The Promontory was then part of a mountain chain that linked the Australian mainland with Tasmania.

At the end of the most recent ice age (ca. 12,000 years ago), the Promontory became an island. Then sand accumulated, creating a low isthmus between the island and the mainland.

When the molten rock (mentioned above) cooled, it led to the formation of garnets, rubies and sapphires. Iron deposits were also left as can be seen in the red-hued iron stains on rocks beside Tidal River.





Flora and Fauna

Forests of eucalyts and bankias cover the ranges. The world's most southerly mangrove forest can be seen at Corner Inlet. There are around 700 species of plants in all.

Tame rosellas, possums and wallabies live and interact with visitors who visit Tidal Creek. In the more isolated parts of the Promontory you may see bandicoots, koalas, wombats, platypuses, quolls and echidnas.

Entrance Fees and Information

When entering the Wilsons Promontory you will have to pay an entry fee (currently $9 per car). Most people then head for Tidal River and their first stop there is the Parks Victoria Information Office, which has useful brochures (e.g. Discovery the Prom), maps and more. Tidal River also has a camping ground, a general store, a cafe, a petrol station, and a cinema.

Walks

Near Tidal River
Lilly Pilly Gully Nature Walk
Squeaky Beach Nature Walk

Southern Area
Great Promontory Walk
Mt Oberon Nature Walk
Sealers Cove Track
South East Point

Northern Area
Millers Landing (on Corner Inlet); etc.


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Author: David Paul Wagner
(David Paul Wagner on Google+)









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